VeryPC GreenPC TT3V - green PC review

Very PC focusses on energy efficient PC, but does its latest machine offer enough for the corporate buyer?

If all of the above appeals then you'll have to put up with compromises elsewhere, though, for aside for the inclusion of TPM there are few concessions to business users. Inside the case, for instance, there's none of the modular design that makes the Lenovo ThinkCentre M58 so appealing. It's a mess of wires and most of the components are screwed in place, making them time-consuming to remove and replace.

If you have the time to navigate the wiry mess and get your screwdriver out, there's some upgrade potential: the standard, low-profile Intel heatsink can be removed for an easy CPU upgrade, and there's one free DIMM socket for increasing the RAM to up to 4GB.

There's also a single PCI Express 1x slot. This can be mated with a one-slot riser card, which is available as an optional extra. We'd recommend sticking to a portable hard disk, but adding a 3.5in disk should be possible if you're willing to indulge in some creative cabling.

And, as usual with VeryPC, the base unit we've reviewed can be customised with all manner of upgrades and extras. The CPU can be boosted to a quad-core model for between 63 and 174 exc VAT; the 2GB of RAM can be doubled for 18; and a 7,200rpm, 500GB hard disk costs 55.

A Blu-ray upgrade is also available at 176, but with HDMI outputs appearing only on the forthcoming consumer version of this machine, this seems somewhat unnecessary. We've also been assured that wireless and TV tuner options will be available for use in the PCI Express 1x slot, although no pricing details are available as yet.

But while the TT3V may be a frugal PC in a stylish chassis, its lack of business-focused features mean that it falls behind in our estimates compared to the corporate focussed Lenovo ThinkCentre M58.

While the VeryPC is faster in our benchmarks, the Lenovo includes double the amount of storage, basic peripherals, and a more versatile chassis for about the same price. Consequently, the TT3V may be the best Treeton yet, but it's worth buying only if a low power draw is your main concern.

Verdict

The usual frugal VeryPC with plenty of power in reserve, but not the best business proposition.

Processor: 3GHz Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 Memory: 2GB 800MHz DDR2 RAM Storage: 160GB hard disk, DVD writer Graphics: Intel GMA X4500HD graphics Ports: 2 x DVI-I, 8 x USB, FireWire, Gigabit Ethernet, eSATA OS: Windows XP Professional, Warranty: 3yr RTB warranty Dimensions: 202 x 281 x 100mm (WDH) Weight: 3.1kg

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