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Forget a PC, the iPad Pro is a computer replacement

Tim Cook said he no longers sees the point of using a PC when a tablet can offer the same productivity

Apple's chief has slammed PCs, saying there's no point to buying or using one when products like the iPad Pro can do the job as well.

Tim Cook told the Telegraph's Allister Heath at a preview of the iPad Pro that there's no need for a bulky computer when an iPad Pro can do everything a PC can do, but in a much slimmer, more portable package.

"I think if you're looking at a PC, why would you buy a PC anymore? No really, why would you buy one?"Cook said.

When asked whether the iPad Pro has been designed as a computer replacement, Cook commented: "Yes, the iPad Pro is a replacement for a notebook or a desktop for many, many people. They will start using it and conclude they no longer need to use anything else, other than their phones."

As people start moving towards bigger phones, such as the company's 5.5-inch iPhone 6S Plus, everything can be done on a mobile device, large PC screens become obsolete. He mentioned the ability to sketch, to listen to music and consume entertainment such as films.

This is quite a back-track on Cook's thoughts in April 2012 when he accused Microsoft of "being confused" by turning PCs into tablets and tablets into PCs. "You can converge a toaster and a refrigerator, but you know, those things are probably not going to be pleasing to the user," he said at the time.

The subject of encryption unsurprisingly sprang up too, with Cook defending his position that encryption is essential in the fight against cybercrime and terrorism.

"To protect people who use any products, you have to encrypt. You can just look around and see all the data breaches that are going on," he told the Telegraph. "These things are becoming more frequent. They can not only result in privacy breaches but also security issues. We believe very strongly in end-to-end encryption and no back doors.

"We don't think people want us to read their messages. We don't feel we have the right to read their emails."

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