News

UK demands EU drops right to be forgotten law

The government has asked for the right to be forgotten law to be removed from new European Union data protection laws

The UK government has requested the Right to be Forgotten law be dropped from the European Union's data protection legislation.

The Right to be Forgotten ruling, which allows search results deemed to be "inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant", or those that infringe an individual's privacy to be deleted from search engines including Google at the request of individuals, should not be administered by the EU.

Since May when the ruling was put in place, 70,000 people have requested Google delete links to articles from its search results.

Justice minister Simon Hughes told the House of Lords: "The government is currently negotiating with our 27 partners to get a new law, which is the new directive and we, the UK, would not want what is currently in the draft, which is the Right to be Forgotten, to remain. We want it to be removed, we think it is the wrong position," he said.

"I don't think as an individual and as a minister that we want the law to develop in the way that is implied by this judgment that you close down access to information in the EU, which is open in the rest of the world."

Since the directive has been announced, many media outlets including the BBC and The Guardian have voiced concerns and argued that content which is outdated still has relevancy and this ruling is one step towards media censorship.

The European Court of Justice has said that people should be able to ask for certain information about themselves to be removed from search engines, but according to some critics, Google has spun this to mean it doesn't need to tell users if certain search results have been omitted as it previously did.

Last week, Google responded to criticisms regarding its rush to implement the right to be forgotten ruling after a BBC writer objected to one of his posts being removed from the search engine.

The BBC's economics editor, Robert Peston, claimed the removal of his 2007 blog post was effectively Google casting him "into oblivion" after a commenter ask that it be removed from search.

Featured Resources

How virtual desktop infrastructure enables digital transformation

Challenges and benefits of VDI

Free download

The Okta digital trust index

Exploring the human edge of trust

Free download

Optimising workload placement in your hybrid cloud

Deliver increased IT agility with the cloud

Free Download

Modernise endpoint protection and leave your legacy challenges behind

The risk of keeping your legacy endpoint security tools

Download now

Recommended

Google banned from importing patent-infringing tech following Sonos IP victory
Policy & legislation

Google banned from importing patent-infringing tech following Sonos IP victory

7 Jan 2022
Google, Facebook fined €210 million for making it difficult for users to reject cookies
Policy & legislation

Google, Facebook fined €210 million for making it difficult for users to reject cookies

6 Jan 2022
Google is working with leading PC manufacturers to improve Android on Windows
Google Android

Google is working with leading PC manufacturers to improve Android on Windows

6 Jan 2022
Google Cloud acquires Israeli security startup Siemplify
cloud security

Google Cloud acquires Israeli security startup Siemplify

5 Jan 2022

Most Popular

How to boot Windows 11 in Safe Mode
Microsoft Windows

How to boot Windows 11 in Safe Mode

6 Jan 2022
Dell XPS 15 (2021) review: The best just got better
Laptops

Dell XPS 15 (2021) review: The best just got better

14 Jan 2022
How to speed up Windows 11
Microsoft Windows

How to speed up Windows 11

7 Jan 2022